Monday, July 29, 2013

What kind of sins are the worst?

What kind of sins are the worst?


Shma Israel - Part 1 - Prayer before retiring at night - Kriyat Shma al Hamita

Shma Israel - Part 1 - Prayer before retiring at night - Kriyat Shma al Hamita


Prayer before retiring at night - Kriyat Shma al Hamita 

- Why we say it.

- Why it's so important so say it

- Why we must do it according to Gemara 

- Why we must do it according to Kabalah

By Alon Anava


Watch this short video explaining the Jewish understanding of Isaiah 53.


Chosen People Ministries has focused on Isaiah 53 because it believes this passage is one of its most powerful proof-texts. When read out-of-context and mistranslated, Isaiah 53 gives the impression of a prophecy describing the suffering and death of the messiah, specifically Jesus dying for our sins.
This Christian interpretation is absolutely incorrect for several good reasons. Isaiah commonly uses familiar metaphors and often speaks of the people of Israel as a single individual referred to as the Servant of God. Moreover in nine previous  passages, Isaiah identifies the Servant to be  Israel, as we see in Isaiah 41:8  “Israel is my Servant…” and Isaiah 43:10 “You are My witnesses says the Lord, and My Servant whom I have chosen…”
Chapters 52-53 describe the reaction of the nations of the world when they witness the future and ultimate redemption of the Jewish people.
Initially, the nations viewed the Jewish people scornfully and considered them to be rejected by God and deserving of suffering and His divine punishment. Isaiah states that in the future, the nations will be shocked and dumbfounded when they witness God’s unexpected and glorious redemption of the Jewish people.
The nations will then contrast their new realization of Israel’s grandeur with their previous beliefs. Ultimately, they will conclude that the Jews were not rejected by God, but in fact, they suffered from the unjustified and disproportionate persecution inflicted upon them by the nations of the world.
To validate their biased misinterpretation, missionaries intentionally avoid mention of a critical fact. In Isaiah 53:5, they deliberately mistranslate the word “from” as“for”, andthereby claim that the Servant will suffer for the sins of the Jewish people. In fact, the verse says that the nations of the world will actually admit that Israel – the Servant of God – “was wounded from our transgressions, bruisedfrom our iniquities.” In the original Hebrew, the letter “מ – mem” which serves as the prefix to the words “transgressions” and “iniquities” means “from”, not “for.”Therefore, this verse cannot be read as supporting the Christian view that the Servant, namely Jesus, suffers for the sins of the world.
In fact, many Christian commentaries including the New English Bible: Oxford Study EditionThe New Interpreters Study Bible and The Harper Collins Study Bible agree with the Jewish interpretation of Isaiah 53. For example, the Oxford Study Edition states, “Israel, the servant of God, has suffered as a humiliated individual.”


Fox News Anchor Totally Outmatched By Religious Scholar- How do Muslims View Jesus of Nazareth?

Fox News Anchor Totally Outmatched By Religious Scholar- How do Muslims View Jesus of Nazareth?

Fox News Anchor Totally Outmatched By Religious Scholar Defending His Book On Jesus

A rather awkward exchange occurred on Fox News' "Spirited Debate" program Friday, with religion correspondent Lauren Green somewhat incredulous that Muslim scholar Reza Aslan could write a book about Jesus Christ.
Aslan's book, "Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth," pieces together gospel and many historical sources to paint a picture of Jesus and the time in which he lived. 
"You're a Muslim, so why did you write a book about the founder of Christianity?" Green asks at the beginning of the interview.
"Well, to be clear, I am a scholar of religions with four degrees, including one in the New Testament, and fluency in biblical Greek, who has been studying the origins of Christianity for two decades," Aslan says, "who also just happens to be a Muslim."
This wouldn't be the only time Aslan had to remind the host he was a religious scholar and an academic. As a professor of religion, Aslan says, "that's what I do for a living, actually."
Later in the interview, Green likens his writing on the topic to having a "Democrat write a book about why Reagan wasn't a good Republican. That just doesn't work."
"It would be like a Democrat with a Ph.D. in Reagan who has been studying his life and history for two decades writing a book about Reagan," responds Aslan.


How Muslims View Jesus of Nazareth, The Virgin Birth and Mary?
(Video Below)

Debate Pentecostal Christian vs Muslims

"To use the New Testament to prove New Testament concepts is like using Twilight book to prove vampires are real."


Monday, July 22, 2013

Oneness Pentecostals Debate Muslims

Debate Oneness Pentecostals (David Bernard) vs Muslims

Published on Apr 21, 2013

Debate Oneness Pentecostals (David Bernard) vs Muslims

"True understanding is in the heart. Even the heathen nations possess understanding but not in their heart. The heart must be filled with awe. It is not enough to acknowledge God in the mind alone. It is necessary for one to draw his understanding down into the heart and to be so aware of the Creator that one's heart is filled with awe and fear of the greatness of God and one is aroused to serve Him with true devotion in the knowledge of His utter exaltedness. The way to achieve this is through meditation, through examining oneself and weighing all one's actions. This is the path to the `light that is treasured up for the just'." Rabbi Nachman  (Likutey Moharan)

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Tuesday, July 9, 2013

The Experience of the False Prophet by yourphariseefriend

The Experience of the False Prophet

The Experience of the False Prophet
by yourphariseefriend
What is a “false prophet”? Is it someone who makes up a story out of his hat but never had any experience to back up that story? Or is it perhaps someone who had a profound experience but the experience is actually misleading?
There is no question that some false prophets simply concocted “visions” out of thin air but the Bible also teaches us about another type of “false prophet”.
In the First Book of Kings chapter 22 we are introduced to Zedekiah son of Chenaanah. This Zedekiah prophesied to King Ahab but his prophecy was false. Michaiah, who was a true prophet of God, described how Zedekiah had been misled. Michaiah describes God’s heavenly court sitting in judgment over Ahab. The court seeks to destroy Ahab and a medium is sought to accomplish this goal. A spirit is sent forth to persuade Ahab to go to battle where he will meet his fate. This spirit sent from on high was a real experience that Zedekiah and the other false prophets truly felt. But it was sent to mislead and to confuse.
It is clear that the fact that someone undergoes an “experience” does not prove anything. When Moses teaches us about the miracles of the false prophet he describes them as a test from God (Deuteronomy 13:4). Moses doesn’t tell us that the false prophet cannot perform miracles, signs and wonders. Instead Moses tells us that we need to measure those experiences, we need to evaluate those miracles and use our sense of discernment to understand if the miracles and the experiences are tests from God or if they are true prophecy.
The yardstick that God granted our nation so that we can evaluate these supernatural experiences is the testimony of our nation. Is the experience leading us in the path that God set us on when he took us out of Egypt or are these miracles introducing a “new” and “better” path?
Throughout history many people have attempted to market their “new paths” by claiming to be the real and rediscovered “old path”. But the path that God set us on travels through the hearts of His witness nation. And the only way that these people can claim our path for themselves is by dismissing our testimony.
As the nation chosen by God we have the responsibility toward ourselves and towards the world to remain loyal to the testimony with which we were entrusted. And the prophet Isaiah prophesied that the purpose of the Lord will indeed be fulfilled through our people. With our hearts on fire for God we will yet illuminate the world (Isaiah 60:3).

All of the Pagan myths had been circulating for centuries before Jesus birth (circa 4 to 7 BCE). It is obvious that if any copying occurred, it was the followers of Jesus incorporating into his biography the myths and legends of Osiris-Dionysus, not vice-versa.

The necessity of speaking in tongues for salvation? 
"Hear an alleged tongues and interpretation where "God" says his mercy is gone, he's going to turn against someone(s) in that church and will pour out his wrath that night." @ 9:30  

The Six Constant Mitzvot are:

Know there is a God. Don't believe in other gods. God is one. Love God. Fear God. Don't be misled by your heart and eyes. Every moment of awareness is another occasion to actualize these goals. None of the other mitzvot has that same constant opportunity, and that's why the Six Constant Mitzvot are our priority. All the other mitzvot only build and bolster these goals.

INTELLECTUAL KNOWLEDGE OF GOD The first of the Ten Commandments declares: "I am the Lord your God who brought you out of Egypt" (Exodus 20:2).

This is the mitzvah (commandment) to "Know there is a God."

The logic underlying this commandment seems difficult to understand. Someone who already observe God's commandments obviously believes in His existence -- so what need is there for a new command to do so? And if someone doesn't know that God exists, why should he listen to this command?!

So exactly who is this mitzvah for?

The answer is that we should not believe in God "on faith" alone. Investigate the evidence. Get knowledge. Research. Study. Analyze. It is a fundamental principle of Judaism: You have to know, not just believe.

EMOTIONAL TRUST "You shall know this day, and understand it in your heart, that the Almighty is God" (Deut. 4:39, the "Aleynu" prayer).

But there's more. It is not enough to intellectually know that God is in charge of everything. You must also know it in your heart. This emotional knowledge is much more profound, because it affects how a person actually conducts his life.

The circus performer is willing to walk the tightrope because he is confident there's a net below to catch him. Similarly, a child will jump down off a ledge into his father's arms, completely confident that his father will catch him.

The whole point of life is to strengthen your awareness of God. How do you know if you're really aware of God? Through trust. If you are, then you are willing to walk the tightrope, so to speak, or jump into your father's arms.[a]
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